Tag Archives: mumbai

Plotting & Scheming: Constructing Sandhurst Road in Colonial Bombay, 1898-1925

Please click here to download my presentation (PDF) to the faculty and students of the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences (CSSS) Calcutta/Kolkata on 3 March 2017. My seminar talk was hosted and chaired by historians Professor Lakshmi Subramanian and Dr Prachi Deshpande. It is based on two chapters from my forthcoming book, Empire’s Metropolis: Money, Time & Space in Colonial Bombay, 1860-1920.

Sandhurst Road Scheme no.3

In the late 1890s, an epidemic of bubonic plague swept through the ports of the British Empire in Asia, dramatising the vulnerability of imperial power in its urban centres of command and control. Colonial cities like Calcutta and Bombay served as gateways to regional and global flows of people, money and machines, centralised and accelerated by networks of steam, rail and electricity. Freedom to trade and the rule of law underpinned both business and politics. Within these cities, power was shared and contested between colonial rulers, Indian elites and urban populations.

My presentation explores the social and spatial restructuring of early 20th century Bombay in the wake of the plague epidemic, through a study of the construction of Sandhurst Road, an east-west arterial avenue. Since 1955 known as Sardar Vallabbhai Patel (SVP) Marg, Sandhurst Road was named after the British Governor of Bombay Presidency who tackled the outbreak of bubonic plague in western India in 1896 by establishing the Bombay Improvement Trust (BIT) to “clean up” the city.

Continue reading Plotting & Scheming: Constructing Sandhurst Road in Colonial Bombay, 1898-1925

आलेखन व आखणी : वासाहतिक बॉम्बेमध्ये झालेलं सँडहर्स्ट रस्त्याचं बांधकाम, १८९८-१९२५

This is a Marathi translation by Avadhoot of “Plotting & Scheming: Constructing Sandhurst Road in Colonial Bombay, 1898-1925″.

सेंटर फॉर स्टडीज् इन सोशल सायन्सेन (सीएसएसएस), कोलकाता’ इथं ३ मार्च २०१७ रोजी मी दिलेल्या व्याख्यानाचा हा गोषवारा आहे. प्राध्यापक लक्ष्मी सुब्रमण्यमडॉ. प्राची देशपांडे हे इतिहासकार या कार्यक्रमाचे यजमान व अध्यक्ष होते. ‘एम्पायर’स् मेट्रॉपलिस: मनी, टाइम अँड स्पेस इन कलोनिअल बॉम्बे, १८६०-१९२०’ या माझ्या आगामी पुस्तकातील दोन प्रकरणांवर हे व्याख्यान आधारलेलं होतं.

Sandhurst Road Scheme no.3

आशियातील ब्रिटिश साम्राज्याच्या बंदरांवर १८९०च्या दशकाच्या अखेरीला गाठीच्या प्लेगाची साथ पसरली. यामुळं साम्राज्यवादी सत्तेचं प्रभुत्व व नियंत्रण असलेल्या नागरी केंद्रांमधील असुरक्षिततेला नाट्यमय वळण मिळालं. कलकत्ता व मुंबई यांसारखी वासाहतिक शहरं प्रादेशिक व जागतिक पातळीवर लोक, पैसा व यंत्रं यांच्या दळणवळणाची प्रवेशद्वारं होती. वाफेची इंजिनं, रेल्वे आणि वीज यांच्या जाळ्यातून या शहरांचं केंद्रीकरण झालं होतं व त्यांना चालनाही मिळत होती. व्यवसाय आणि राजकारण या दोन्हींचा अंतःप्रवाह व्यापाराचं स्वातंत्र्य व कायद्याचं राज्य असा होता. या शहरांमध्ये वासाहतिक सत्ताधारी, भारतीय उच्चभ्रू आणि नागरी जनता यांच्यात सत्तेचं वाटप झालेलं होतं आणि सत्तासंघर्षही त्यांच्यातच होत असे.

प्लेगच्या साथीमुळं विसाव्या शतकातील मुंबईमध्ये सामाजिकदृष्ट्या व स्थलावकाशदृष्ट्या कोणते बदल झाले याचा शोध घेण्याचा प्रयत्न माझ्या सादरीकरणात केलेला आहे. पूर्व व पश्चिम भागांना जोडणाऱ्या सँडहर्स्ट रस्त्याच्या बांधणीसंदर्भात हा अभ्यास केलेला आहे. १९५५ सालापासून ‘सरदार वल्लभभाई पटेल (एसव्हीपी) मार्ग’ या नावानं ओळखल्या जाणाऱ्या या रस्त्याचं आधीचं नाव मुंबई प्रांताचा ब्रिटिश गव्हर्नर सँडहर्स्ट याच्यावरून ठेवलेलं होतं. १८९६ साली पश्चिम भारतातील गाठीच्या प्लेगची साथ निवारण्यासाठी ‘बॉम्बे इम्प्रूव्हमेन्ट ट्रस्ट’ (बीआयटी) या संस्थेची स्थापना याच सँडहर्स्ट यांनी केली.

Continue reading आलेखन व आखणी : वासाहतिक बॉम्बेमध्ये झालेलं सँडहर्स्ट रस्त्याचं बांधकाम, १८९८-१९२५

Bombay Time: Power, Public Culture & Identity, 1870-1955

Towards New Histories of Mumbai, 6-7 January 2017, Department of History, University of Mumbai
Towards New Histories of Mumbai, 6-7 January 2017, Department of History, University of Mumbai

Please click here to download my presentation (PDF) on “Bombay Time: Turning Back the Clock, 1870-1955″. As a tribute to our friend and mentor Professor Jim Masselos, the Department of History at the University of Mumbai, the School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), University of London and the University of Leicester hosted a conclave of historians, scholars and researchers of the city at the Vidyanagari Campus of Mumbai University on Friday 6 to Saturday 7 January 2017. Special thanks to Profs Manjiri Kamat, Prashant Kidambi and Rachel Dwyer for organising this conference.

The completion of global networks of railways, telegraphs and steamships across British India and globally in the 1870­-1880s made possible the coordination of time signals across these lines of communication and transport, as observatories electrically transmitted the precise longitudinal time simultaneously from cities such as Madras and Bombay to their expanding territorial and maritime frontiers. However, the proposal to standardise time-keeping in cities confronted a multitude of visible and audible temporal signs in the urban environment – public clocks, factory sirens, office shifts, railway timetables, sunlight and sunset – as well as across the vast subcontinent, where local solar times varied by more than an hour between Calcutta in the east and Karachi in the west.

Despite repeated attempts to secure uniformity by colonial scientists and the state, a patchwork of temporal standards in colonial India resulted from rivalries between scientists, port, railway and municipal authorities, and persistent defiance of these standards by religious and civic leaders, traders, and the urban public. “Railway Time” or “Mean Time” on the longitude of the Madras Observatory – fixed on the completion of the trans-continental railway link with Bombay in the 1870s – encountered stiff public resistance in Bombay, for whom the new standard was more than 30 minutes ahead of local solar time, or “Bombay Time”, and was hastily withdrawn.

The introduction of “Indian Standard Time” (IST) amidst Lokmanya Tilak’s arrest and trial and the “Swadeshi” agitations in 1905-06 prompted further protest, from the stoning of public clock-towers to strikes by office employees and factory workers, as the state attempted to “turn back the clock” by more than half an hour. Thereafter, “Bombay Time” was observed in the city as an insignia of native difference and everyday resistance, as the “annihilation of space by time” was reversed in the spatial arenas of urban temporality. For Indian workers and office employees, “Bombay Time” could turn up later at work; native bankers and brokers could remain open for trading later than European commercial banks; and local philanthropists and municipal leaders sponsored public clocks at variance with official IST.

My paper revisits Jim Masselos’s essay “Bombay Time” (Meera Kosambi, ed., Intersections: Socio-Cultural Trends in Maharashtra, Hyderabad: Orient Longman, 2000, pp.161–83), seeking to complement and deepen Masselos’s pioneering research into the standardisation of clock time in the colonial city. My paper will explore how “Bombay Time” dramatised the social construction and moral economy of time, extending Masselos’s original insights on the transformation of urban life in the context of technological change with new material from the municipal and state archives, and up to the demise of “Bombay Time” during World War II and after Independence.

बॉम्बे टाइम: सत्ता, लोकसंस्कृती व अस्मिता, १८७०-१९५५

Towards New Histories of Mumbai, 6-7 January 2017, Department of History, University of Mumbai
Towards New Histories of Mumbai, 6-7 January 2017, Department of History, University of Mumbai

This is a Marathi translation of my talk and presentation “Bombay Time: Power, Public Culture & Identity, 1870-1955″

बॉम्बे टाइम: टर्निंग बॅक द क्लॉक, १८७०-१९५५’ हे माझं सादरीकरण डाउनलोड करण्यासाठी इथं क्लिक करा. आमचे मित्र व मार्गदर्शक प्राध्यापक जिम मॅसेलोस यांच्या सन्मानार्थ मुंबई विद्यापीठाचा इतिहास विभाग, लंडन विद्यापीठातील ‘स्कूल ऑफ ओरिएन्टल अँड आफ्रिकन स्टडीज्’ (एसओएएस) आणि लाइकेस्टर विद्यापीठ यांनी इतिहासकार, अभ्यासक व संशोधकांची एक परिषद शुक्रवार ६ ते शनिवार ७ जानेवारी २०१७ या दिवसांमध्ये मुंबई विद्यापीठाच्या विद्यानगरी आवारामध्ये आयोजित केली होती. प्राध्यापक मंजिरी कामत, प्रशांत किदम्बीरेचल ड्वायर यांनी ही परिषद आयोजित केल्याबद्दल त्यांचे विशेष आभार.

रेल्वे, तारायंत्रं व वाफेवर चालणारी जहाजं यांचं जागतिक जाळं ब्रिटीशशासित भारतात आणि जागतिक पातळीवर १८७०-१८८०च्या दशकांमध्ये पूर्ण झालं. या सर्व संदेशन व वाहतूक मार्गांदरम्यानच्या वेळेसंबंधित इशाऱ्यांचं संयोजन करणंही शक्य झालं, कारण अचूक रेखांशीय वेळ मद्रास व मुंबई अशा शहरांमधून एकाच वेळी त्यांच्या विस्तारीत भौगोलिक व समुद्री सीमांपर्यंत विद्युतमार्गे पाठवण्याचं काम निरीक्षणशाळा करत होत्या. पण शहरातील वेळमापन प्रमाणित करण्याच्या प्रयत्नांना नागरी पर्यावरणातील अनेक दृश्य व श्राव्य कालबाधित चिन्हांना सामोरं जावं लागलं: सार्वजनिक घड्याळं, कारखान्यांचे भोंगे, कार्यालयीन पाळ्या, रेल्वेची वेळापत्रकं, सूर्योदय व सूर्यास्त हे घटक होतेच; शिवाय या महाकाय उपखंडात पूर्वेकडे कलकत्त्यापासून ते पश्चिमेतील कराचीपर्यंत स्थानिक सौरवेळा तासाभरापेक्षाही अधिक अंतरानं बदलत्या होत्या.

वासाहतिक वैज्ञानिक व राज्यसंस्थेनं वेळेच्या बाबतीत एकवाक्यता आणण्यासाठी वारंवार प्रयत्न केले. पण वासाहतिक भारतातील प्रमाणित वेळेसंबंधीच्या अशा ठिगळकामातून वैज्ञानिक, बंदर, रेल्वे व महापालिका प्रशासन यांच्यात परस्पर स्पर्धेचा भाव निर्माण झाला. धार्मिक व नागरी नेते, व्यापारी व नागरी जनता यांनी या प्रमाणकांना सातत्यानं धुडकावून लावलं. मद्रास निरीक्षणशाळेच्या रेखांशानुसार निश्चित केलेल्या ‘प्रमाण वेळे’ला मुंबईतील लोकांनी कठोर विरोध केला. आंतरखंडीय रेल्वे-मार्ग पूर्ण झाल्यावर १८७०च्या दशकात मुंबईसोबत निश्चित करण्यात आलेली ही वेळ ‘रेल्वे टाइम’ म्हणूनही ओळखली जात होती. पण मुंबईतील स्थानिक सौरवेळेपेक्षा किंवा ‘बॉम्बे टाइम’पेक्षा मद्रास निरीक्षणशाळेची ही नवीन प्रमाणित वेळ तीस मिनिटांनी पुढं होती. त्यामुळं विरोध झाल्यावर घाईगडबडीनं ही वेळ मागे घेण्यात आली.

त्यानंतर, १९०५-०६मध्ये सुरू असलेलं स्वदेशी आंदोलन, लोकमान्य टिळकांना झालेली अटक व त्यांच्यावरील खटला या घडामोडींच्या काळात ‘भारतीय प्रमाण वेळ’ अंमलात आली, त्यातून जनक्षोभात वाढच झाली. सरकारनं घड्याळ अर्धा तासाहून अधिक अवधीसाठी मागं फिरवायचा प्रयत्न केल्यावर, सार्वजनिक घड्याळांच्या मनोऱ्यांवर दगडफेक करण्यापासून ते कार्यालयीन कर्मचारी व कारखान्यातील कामगारांनी संप करण्यापर्यंत विविध मार्ग निषेधासाठी अवलंबण्यात आले. त्यानंतर मुंबईमध्ये देशी वेगळेपणा दर्शवण्यासाठी मानचिन्हासारखा ‘बॉम्बे टाइम’चा वापर सुरू झाला. ‘वेळेनं केलेलं अवकाशाचं उच्चाटन’ नाकारण्यासाठी नागरी कालबद्धतेच्या स्थलावकाशातला एक रोजचा प्रतिकार म्हणून हा व्यवहार सुरू होता. भारतीय कामगार व कार्यालयीन कर्मचाऱ्यांसाठी काम सुरू झाल्यावर थोड्या अवधीनं ‘बॉम्बे टाइम’ सुरू होत असे; देशी बँकर व ब्रोकरांना युरोपीय व्यावसायिक बँकांपेक्षा जास्तीचा काही वेळ काम सुरू ठेवता येत असे; आणि अधिकृत भारतीय प्रमाण वेळेपेक्षा भिन्न वेळ दाखवणाऱ्या सार्वजनिक घड्याळ्यांना स्थानिक समाजसेवक व नेते पाठबळ देत असत.

जिम मॅसेलोस यांच्या “बॉम्बे टाइम” (मीरा कोसम्बी संपादित ‘इंटरसेक्शन्स: सोशिओ-कल्चरल ट्रेन्ड्स इन महाराष्ट्र’, हैदराबाद: ओरिएन्ट लॉन्गमन, २०००, पानं १६१-८३) या निबंधाचं पुनर्वाचन मी माझ्या पेपरमध्ये केलं आहे. वासाहतिक मुंबईतील घड्याळी वेळेच्या प्रमाणीकरणासंबंधी मॅसेलोस यांनी केलेलं काम आद्य स्वरूपाचं आहे. मॅसेलोस यांच्या मांडणीला पूरक सखोलता मिळेल अशी मांडणी करायचा प्रयत्न मी प्रस्तुत पेपरद्वारे केला आहे. ‘बॉम्बे टाइम’मुळं शहरातील सामाजिक रचना आणि वेळेची नीती-अर्थव्यवस्था कशा रितीनं बदलली हे शोधायचा प्रयत्न मी केला आहे. तांत्रिक बदलाच्या संदर्भात नागरी जीवनामध्ये घडून येणाऱ्या परिवर्तनासंबंधी मॅसेलोस यांनी दिलेल्या मर्मदृष्टीचा विस्तार करताना मी महानगरपालिकेच्या व सरकारच्या दस्तावेजांमधील नवीन सामग्रीचा विचार केला आहे. दुसऱ्या महायुद्धाच्या काळात व स्वातंत्र्यानंतर ‘बॉम्बे टाइम’चा अंत कसा झाला, त्याचीही मांडणी केली आहे.

The Master of the Game: The Woman Who Wouldn’t Let Donald Trump Mumbai

Click here to download this presentation (PDF) which I gave in the South Asian Studies Programme (SASP) seminar series at the National University of Singapore (NUS). You can also download and listen to the podcast (MP3) on the NUS Asia Research Institute (ARI) website.

My seminar talk was held on Wednesday 9 November 2016 in Singapore, just as the final results were announced on U.S. Election Day, and Donald J. Trump defeated Hillary Clinton to win the U.S. Presidential election. This seminar was chaired by Prof Annu Jalais.

woman_smita

This presentation was based on and develops an earlier talk on Donald Trump in Mumbai given at the workshop “Constructing Asia: Materiality, Capital & Labour in the Making of an Urbanising Landscape” organised at ARI on 12–13 May 2016 by Dr Malini Sur and Dr Eli Asher Elinoff, where I presented a talk on “Constructing Trump Tower Mumbai”.

poster

Mumbai’s real estate is amongst the most expensive per square foot anywhere in the world. Property developers and construction magnates dominate the city’s political economy and public culture, and are portrayed as sovereigns of its skyline, an imagined community whom city newspapers commonly refer to as “the builder-politician nexus”.

Builders’ unique appetites for risk make visible and channel the desires of millions for new and better futures (or to make things “great again”). Both real estate and politics are shadowy domains which demonstrate how money, time and space are sources of social power in the contemporary city. The games of language and number played with them favour those who can challenge norms, wait out long battles, and anticipate changes in the rules.

Rather than seeing those who play them as gamblers, populists or moral failures, we need to understand their business strategies as the materialisation of uncertainty. On the occasion of the U.S. Election Day, my talk will focus on the business of building a luxury high-rise Trump Tower in Mumbai and Donald Trump’s Indian apprentices and opponents, first on the disputed site of a charitable hospital and community housing trust, and later in an old textile mill compound.

This presentation is part of an ongoing ethnographic and archival project on the real estate speculation and property redevelopment in post-industrial Mumbai.

Happy Birthday, Mr Commissioner

Published in Mumbai Mirror as “Happy Birthday, Mr MC” on 2 July 2015.

It is a year of missed anniversaries in Mumbai. The downpour which shut down the city on 19 June 2015 not only forced the Shiv Sena to cancel its Golden Jubilee celebrations, but to answer for more than two decades running a municipality larger than many state governments. While the ruling party must indeed be held to account, another, much older, anniversary that passed unnoticed should help explain why India’s oldest and wealthiest civic body remains such a mess. In 150 years there has been hardly any structural change in the institutions of municipal government in Mumbai.

Arthur Travers Crawford, first Municipal Commissioner of Bombay (1865-71)
Arthur Travers Crawford, first Municipal Commissioner of Bombay (1865-71)

On 1 July 1865, the first “Municipal Commissioner for the Town and Island of Bombay”, Arthur Trawers Crawford, was appointed by the Government of Bombay, along with the predecessor to today’s municipal Corporators – a body of “Justices of the Peace”. The city until then was a swampy archipelago focussed on trading, where government was minimal and ad-hoc. JPs had scant powers over policing and conservancy, to collect taxes, or keep the streets drained and swept. Funds were vested in three commissioners answering directly to government, a “triumvirate” which often worked at cross-purposes.

While moving the new Act of 1865 for a single “Chief Executive” for Mumbai along with Sir Jamshetji Jeejeebhoy in the Governor’s Council, its co-sponsor Walter Cassels commented that “the town does not want municipal officers with the pen of a ready writer, but with brooms that sweep clean”. Crawford set about his task with zeal – laying out streets and markets, improving sanitation and water supply. The JPs soon complained they had no power over his purse strings. Much like today’s appointees, Crawford was then transferred, the “man at the top” whose “head must roll”.

Indian landlords and merchants also demanded their say in civic affairs proportionate to Crawford’s hiked property taxes. It was in the wake of this agitation against hiked rates that a young Pherozeshah Mehta returned from England in 1869 to take up their cause of “no taxation without representation”, and with K.T. Telang helped create the “local self-government” we know in Mumbai today. With the liberal Viceroy Lord Ripon – who laid the founding stone for the BMC Head Office where his statue now stands – Sir Pherozeshah authored the 1888 BMC Act, still the city’s current constitution. This trod a wise path between a colonial executive and the few wealthy Indians who qualified to vote or be elected to the corporation.

By the time “Sir PM” passed away in 1915, Gandhi had just returned to discover his “real India” in the villages, not colonial cities like Bombay. As he toured the countryside to mobilise the masses, by 1922, the British began opening voting to rent-payers, not just property tax-payers. In 1936 the minimum qualification to vote was further reduced from Rs 10 to Rs 5 rent. But beyond expanding the voter franchise and the extending the city limits in 1950 and 1956, by Independence, reforms to urban governance remained stillborn. Even as “Greater Mumbai” grew in size and scale, it was and remains governed by the same 1888 Act, based on the 1865 idea of vesting all executive power in a single, unelected MC.

While Independence did little to transform urban governance, globalisation has now made cities pivotal to the development of their regional and national economies. Today most of Mumbai’s municipal wards are now more populous than most US or European cities, but are still overseen by a single Assistant Commissioner. In Britain – where Lord Ripon’s reforms originated – the Corporator-Commissioner system was replaced with Town Councils in the 70s, though elected urban bodies have made a comeback, especially in London. In the US, popular elected government – especially for city Mayor – has long been a fact of urban life.

In the past decade national laws such as the 74th Amendment and RTI have helped transform urban instititions through slow and constant citizen pressure. Even as “Smart Cities” are being planned all over India, and new cities like Vasai-Virar are created on the same old Victorian model, serious proposals for urban reform remain absent.

India has had an elected Prime Minister under a democratic Constitution for more than sixty years, and the State of Maharashtra its own Assembly and Chief Minister for more than fifty years. Though the Sena briefly experimented with Calcutta’s Mayor-in-Council system in Mumbai in 1989, Mumbai’s Mayor has since 1931 been a ceremonial leader of the House. While Commissioners may come and go, a popular Mayor elected by and responsible to all citizens of Greater Mumbai would be a belated birthday gift for the old Urbs Prima in Indis.

हॅपी बर्थडे, मिस्टर कमिशनर! | शेखर कृष्णन

Marathi translation by Avadhoot of “Happy Birthday, Mr MC” originally published in Mumbai Mirror on 2 July 2015. 

मुंबईसाठी हे वर्ष वर्धापनदिन, जयंती वगैरेंसारखे अनेक दिवस चुकवणारं ठरलं. १९ जून २०१५ रोजी झालेल्या पावसाने शहर बंद पाडलं आणि शिवसेनेला आपला सुवर्ण महोत्सवी समारंभ रद्द करावा लागला. कित्येक राज्य सरकारांपेक्षाही मोठ्या असलेल्या इथल्या महानगरपालिकेवर गेली दोन दशकं शिवसेनेचीच सत्ता होती, त्यामुळे पावसाने शहर बंद पडल्यावर पक्षाला अनेक प्रश्नांनाही सामोरं जावं लागलं. भारतातील ही सर्वांत जुनी महानगरपालिका एवढ्या अनागोंदीमध्ये का आहे, याचं एक उत्तर सत्ताधारी पक्षाच्या अकार्यक्षमतेमध्ये आहेच, पण त्याहूनही तपशीलवार उत्तर हवं असल्यास विस्मरणात गेलेल्या एका जयंती दिवसाची दखल घ्यावी लागेल. मुंबईच्या महानगरपालिका प्रशासनातील विभागांमध्ये गेल्या दीडशे वर्षांत क्वचित रचनात्मक बदल झालेले आहेत.

Arthur Travers Crawford, first Municipal Commissioner (1865) आर्थर ट्रॉवर्स क्रॉफर्ड, पहिले शहर महागरपालिका आयुक्त (१८६५)

तत्कालीन मुंबई सरकारने १ जुलै १८६५ रोजी पहिले ‘म्युनिसिपल कमिशनर फॉर द टाउन अँड आयलँड ऑफ बॉम्बे’ (मुंबई शहर व बेट महागरपालिका आयुक्त) आर्थर ट्रॉवर्स क्रॉफर्ड यांची नियुक्ती केली. शिवाय आता नगरसेवक म्हणून ओळखल्या जाणारे सदस्य- ‘शांततेचे न्यायदूत’ही याच दिवशी नियुक्त करण्यात आले. तोपर्यंत या बेटरूपी शहराचा प्रशासकीय कारभार त्या त्या कामापुरता आणि अतिशय अल्प हस्तक्षेप करणारा होता. पोलीस प्रशासन व मच्छिमारी आणि नाविक व्यवहार असोत की रस्ते स्वच्छ व सुके ठेवण्यासाठीची कार्यवाही असो, यांपैकी कशासंबंधीही पुरेसे अधिकार न्यायदूतांकडे नव्हते. प्रशासकीय निधी तीन आयुक्तांच्या अखत्यारित येत असे आणि हे प्रशासकीय ‘त्रिकूट’ अनेकदा एकमेकांच्या विरोधी जाणाऱ्या कारणांसाठी कार्यरत राहायचं.

गव्हर्नर मंडळामध्ये शहराचे प्रतिनिधित्व सर जमशेटजी जीजीभॉय करत असताना, मुंबईसाठी एकसंध ‘मुख्य कार्यकारिणी’ही असायला हवी यासंबंधीचा नवा कायदा १८६५ साली करण्यात आला; त्यावेळी या कायद्याचे सहप्रवर्तक वॉल्टर कॅसेल्स म्हणाले होते की, ‘एखाद्या तयार लेखकासारखे लेखण्या वागवणारे महानगरपालिका अधिकारी या शहराला नको आहेत, उलट स्वच्छ फटकारे मारणाऱ्या केरसुण्या त्यांच्या हातात असणे जास्त गरजेचे आहे.’ क्रॉफर्ड यांनी आपले काम उत्साहाने सुरू केले- रस्ते व बाजारपेठांची व्यवस्था लावणं, स्वच्छता व पाणी पुरवठ्यामध्ये सुधारणा यांसंबंधी कार्यवाही तत्काळ सुरू झाली. लगेचच आयुक्तांच्या आर्थिक बटव्यावर अंकुश ठेवण्यासंबंधी आपल्याला काहीच अधिकार नसल्याची तक्रार न्यायदूतांनी करायला सुरुवात केली. आजच्या काळाप्रमाणेच क्रॉफर्ड यांची बदली करण्यात आली, ‘वरिष्ठ पदावरील व्यक्तीच्या डोक्यावर टांगती तलवार राहायलाच हवी’.

शिवाय, क्रॉफर्ड यांनी वाढवलेल्या मालमत्ता कराच्या प्रमाणात नागरी व्यवहारांमध्ये आपल्याला अधिकार द्यावेत, अशी मागणी भारतीय जमीनदार व व्यापारी वर्गाने केली. वाढलेल्या कराला झालेल्या या विरोधामधूनच ‘प्रतिनिधित्व नसेल तर कर नाही’ ही मागणी पुढे आली; इंग्लंडहून १८६९ साली परतलेले तरूण फिरोझशहा मेहता यांनी या मागणीसाठी पुढाकार घेतला. आता मुंबईत रूढ असलेल्या ‘स्थानिक स्वराज्या’च्या निर्मितीसाठी के.टी. तेलंग यांचा हातभार लागला. मुंबई महानगरपालिका मुख्य कार्यालयाच्या इमारतीचा पाया रचणारे उदारमतवादी व्हाइसरॉय लॉर्ड रिपन (ज्यांचा या कार्यालयात पुतळाही आहे) यांच्यासोबत सर फिरोझशहा यांनी मुंबई महानगरपालिका कायदा १८८८ तयार केला आणि हाच कायदा शहराची घटना म्हणून सध्याही वापरला जातो. यामुळे वसाहतिक सरकारी कार्यकारिणी आणि मत देण्याचा वा पालिकेत निवडून जाण्याचा अधिकार असलेले मोजके श्रीमंत भारतीय यांच्यातील सामोपचाराचा मार्ग हुशारीने बनवण्यात आला.

सर पीएम’ (फिरोझशहा मेहता) यांचे १९१५ साली निधन झाले, त्याच दरम्यान देशात परतलेल्या गांधींना ‘खऱ्या भारता’चा शोध खेड्यांमध्ये घ्यायचा होता, मुंबईसारख्या वसाहतिक शहरांमध्ये नाही. जनतेमध्ये ऊर्जा पेरण्यासाठी गांधी ग्रामीण भागाचा दौरा करत असताना, ब्रिटिशांनी मालमत्ता करदात्यांसोबतच भाडे देणाऱ्यांनाही मतदानाचा अधिकार प्रदान केला. १९३६ साली मतदानाच्या किमान अर्हतेसाठीचे भाडे दहा रुपयांवरून पाच रुपयांपर्यंत खाली आणण्यात आले. स्वातंत्र्यानंतर मतदारांच्या अधिकारांची कक्षा वाढलीच, शिवाय १९५० व १९५६ या वर्षांमध्ये शहराची सीमाही वाढवण्यात आली, परंतु शहरी प्रशासनासंबंधी सुधारणा लगोलग झाल्या नाहीत. ‘बृहन्मुंबई’ आकाराने आणि प्रमाणाने वाढत गेली, पण तिचे प्रशासन १८८८च्या कायद्याद्वारेच करण्यात येत होते; आणि सर्व कार्यकारी अधिकार एकाच महानगरपालिका आयुक्ताकडे असण्याच्या १८६५ सालच्या कल्पनेवरच हा कायदा आधारलेला होता.

शहरी प्रशासनातील बदलासाठी स्वातंत्र्याचा तसा फायदा नाही, पण आता जागतिकीकरणामुळे शहरांची भूमिका त्या त्या प्रांतीय व राष्ट्रीय अर्थव्यवस्थांसाठी अत्यंत महत्त्वाची ठरणार आहे. सध्या मुंबईतील अनेक पालिका विभाग हे अमेरिका व युरोपातील एखाद्या शहरापेक्षाही जास्त लोकसंख्येचे आहेत, पण त्यांच्या देखरेखीचे काम एकटा सह-आयुक्त करत असतो. लॉर्ड रिपन यांच्या सुधारणा जिथून सुरू झाल्या त्या ब्रिटनमध्ये नगरसेवक-आयुक्त अशी व्यवस्था जाऊन १९७०च्या दशकात ‘टाउन कौन्सिल’ (शहर कार्यकारी मंडळ) अस्तित्वात आले; आणि विशेषकरून इंग्लंडमध्ये लोकनियुक्त शहरी मंडळं उभी राहिली. अमेरिकेमध्ये शहरी जीवनात लोकनियुक्त सरकार- विशेषतः ‘मेयर’ (महापौर) हे पद आधीपासूनच रुजलेले आहे.

गेल्या दशकामध्ये ७४वी घटनादुरुस्ती व माहिती अधिकार कायदा अशा काही राष्ट्रीय कायद्यांमधून शक्य झालेल्या धीम्या पण नियमित नागरी दबावामुळे शहरी आस्थापनांमध्ये काही बदल झालेले दिसतात. देशभरात ‘स्मार्ट सिटी’ उभारण्याच्या योजना आखण्यात येत असताना वसई-विरारसारखी नवी शहरं मात्र त्याच जुन्या व्हिक्टोरियन प्रारूपावरून उभी राहत आहेत. शहर नूतनीकरणासाठी काही गंभीर प्रस्ताव मात्र तयार केले जात नाहीत.

भारतामध्ये साठहून अधिक वर्षं लोकशाही राज्यघटनेच्या चौकटीत लोकनियुक्त पंतप्रधान देशाचा कारभार पाहण्याची कामगिरी पार पाडत आहेत आणि महाराष्ट्र राज्याचा कारभार पाहण्याचे काम पन्नासहून अधिक वर्षं विधानसभा व मुख्यमंत्री करत आहेत. शिवसेनेने १९८९मध्ये मुंबईत कलकत्त्याप्रमाणे ‘कार्यकारी मंडळातील महापौरा’चा तात्पुरता प्रयोग करून पाहिला, अन्यथा १९३१पासून मुंबईचा महापौर हा सभागृहाचा औपचारिक नेता राहिलेला आहे. आयुक्त येतील आणि जातील, परंतु बृह्नमुंबईच्या सर्व नागरिकांनी निवडून दिलेला व त्यांना उत्तरादायी असलेला महापौर हीच भारतातील या सर्वांत जुन्या पहिल्या शहराला दिलेली वाढदिवसाची भेट ठरेल.

Why You Should Download the Mumbai Development Plan Today

Mumbai's New Development Plan? Cartoon by Raj Thackeray, Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS), February-March 2015
Mumbai’s New Development Plan? Cartoon by Raj Thackeray, Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS), February-March 2015

The publication of the proposed Greater Mumbai Development Plan for 2034 over the past month has seen a rare coalition emerge to condemn it, from NGOs and political parties, to celebrities and artistes, and in the past week even the BMC’s own Heritage Conservation Committee. Aggrieved residents and alert activists are seeing dark conspiraces in the details of road alignments, land use reservations, and hikes in FSI (Floor Space Index) across the city. While high FSI has become central to the debate on DP 2034, what matters most for Mumbaikars is how policies like FSI, TDR (Transferable Development Rights) and other Development Control Rules (DCR) can be harnessed to create greater public goods and a better urban environment in the next twenty years.

Portrayed from Left to Right as a sell-out to the construction industry, DP 2034 is in fact a paper template, referred to when permissions are sought for development or redevelopment. Together with the DCR, they define the guidelines and recipe book of policies by which land use, building, zoning, amenities and infrastructure are regulated. DP 2034 will only be the third for Greater Mumbai. The first DP was proposed in 1964 and sanctioned in 1967 for a decade until 1977. It was a broad land use plan, a response by engineers and planners who were horrified by the Island City’s runaway population growth and industrial concentration, even after the annexation of the suburbs to Greater Bombay in the fifties, and the statehood of Maharashtra in the sixties.

Continue reading Why You Should Download the Mumbai Development Plan Today

The Swayambhu Lingam of Sandhurst Road

Shorter version published as “Squaring the Circle”, Mumbai Mirror, Sunday Read, 22 February 2015.

11018634_10153697947729852_1556617658135858432_o

“I need not dilate on the urgent necessity in the interest of our work of removing temples, where necessary, otherwise than by force. In laying out schemes I exclude every religious edifice that I can. But in the case of Hindoo temples it is not possible to exclude all, for they are sprinkled over the City like pepper out of a castor. And if our schemes are not to suffer, we must treat each case liberally”.

Proceedings of the Trustees for the Improvement of the City of Bombay, Special Meeting, 15 January 1907, T.R. 11

On this week’s festival of Maha Shivratri, devotees annually offer prayers in Mumbai’s oldest temple dedicated to Shiva, the Nageshwar Mandir at Sardar Vallabbhai Patel (SVP) Marg. Popularly known as the “Gol Deval”, few who circle around its swayambhu (self-manifested) ling are aware of how this “Round Temple” came to be in the middle of a busy main road. Known before 1955 as Sandhurst Road, this arterial avenue was named after the Governor who tackled the outbreak of bubonic plague in western India in 1896. Lord Sandhurst created the Bombay Improvement Trust (BIT) in 1898 to immunise the city in the wake of the epidemic, arming it with draconian powers of acquisition, demolition and redevelopment, to unclog the city’s arteries and increase its circulation by redeveloping its slums, swamps and streets.

Continue reading The Swayambhu Lingam of Sandhurst Road

Do Buildings Have Agency?

Published in shorter form as “Do Buildings Have Agency?” in Economic and Political Weekly (Mumbai), Vol XLVI No.30, 23 July 2011

Neera Adarkar, ed., The Chawls of Mumbai: Galleries of Life (Gurgaon: imprintOne, 2011)

Can built forms have their own subjectivity? Architects, geographers and urban planners would surely answer this question in the affirmative. By contrast, most historians and social scientists have long viewed all non-human artefacts as “socially constructed”, and the structure and agency of the physical environment has remained weakly conceptualised, even in urban studies.

Given the number of published works on the deindustrialisation of Mumbai and the decline of its textile industry – including an award-winning oral history of mill workersi co-authored by the editor of this new anthology on chawls – it is significant that the most ubiquitous form of working-class housing in the Mumbai had not yet been studied in any depth until nowii. Galleries of Life is a salutary exploration of the history, architecture, culture and politics of chawls which creatively examines the tension between historical nostalgia and contemporary urban change in Mumbai.

Buildings can nurture, constrain, limit and transform those who inhabit or pass through them. Generic typologies mass produced on an industrial scale – apartments, tenements, chawls, skyscrapers and slums – are generative of their peculiar milieus and practices. Like other forms of housing, Mumbai’s iconic chawls are basically physical containers which give shelter and provide shape to social reproduction. But urban housing and the built environment can “act back” on communities and society. Housing as social space can signify a bundle of rights and claims, a locus of legal and property relations, a stage for politics and performance, and a set of resources for survival and mobility.

Continue reading Do Buildings Have Agency?